What's under the ground?

If you have previously lived in a city or town where your home was connected to a public sewer utility the concept of a septic system may be new to you. These pictures will help you get a better understanding of whats going on out there under your lawn, and why you want to get this important part of a home's infrastructure evaluated before making a purchase! 

If your home is not connected to a city sewer service, you will likely have your very own on-site wastewater management system, otherwise known as a septic system!

While there are several variations on these systems, generally you will have a main pipe called a sewer line that runs out of your home and carries all the water and waste from your drains out to your septic tank. 

In the septic tank, the solid wastes settle to the bottom while the liquids continue on out to your leach field. Here the water is filtered through gravel and sand to remove remaining particulate waste before the water makes it's way to the water table. 

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Here is a leach field system under construction. A large pipe runs out from the septic tank and connects to several perforated pipes laid out on sewer rock, which distribute the liquids from the septic tank out into the absorption field. 

Once all the pipes are laid out and connected they will look something like this. This is a particularly large and deep leach bed system designed for an apartment complex. Generally, leach fields require at least 4 feet of ground cover over the absorption area or 2 inches of foam insulation with 2 feet of ground cover over the insulation. This helps to keep your system from freezing in the winter and becoming inoperable.  

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Once the system is buried and grass is planted over it, often the only visible evidence will be the monitor tubes rising out of the ground. It is very important to leave these tubes in place and unobstructed so that they can be used to check on the health and functionality of the system in the future. 

Here is a picture of a sewer line coming out of a home and attaching to a plastic septic tank. The sewer line here has insulation under it to further prevent freezing. 

The entire system will soon be buried, leaving only the monitor tubes for access.

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Here is another septic tank and sewer line, covered with insulation and soon to be buried in earth cover.

This septic system is undergoing a performance evaluation! Over 100 gallons of water will be added to the system, then the water level in the monitor tubes will be measured repeatedly over time to assess how efficiently the system can absorb the water. 

Eventually, all systems will fail. As they filter out the particulates from your wastewaster they will eventually become plugged and require replacement. How long a system lasts depends on it's construction, environment, and useage. For tips on how to prolong the life of your system check out our FAQ page

110_2454-4-quickpic

What's under the ground?

If you have previously lived in a city or town where your home was connected to a public sewer utility the concept of a septic system may be new to you. These pictures will help you get a better understanding of whats going on out there under your lawn, and why you want to get this important part of a home's infrastructure evaluated before making a purchase! 

If your home is not connected to a city sewer service, you will likely have your very own on-site wastewater management system, otherwise known as a septic system!

While there are several variations on these systems, generally you will have a main pipe called a sewer line that runs out of your home and carries all the water and waste from your drains out to your septic tank. 

In the septic tank, the solid wastes settle to the bottom while the liquids continue on out to your leach field. Here the water is filtered through gravel and sand to remove remaining particulate waste before the water makes it's way to the water table. 

133_typ-system

Here is a leach field system under construction. A large pipe runs out from the septic tank and connects to several perforated pipes laid out on sewer rock, which distribute the liquids from the septic tank out into the absorption field. 

96_IMG_1129

Once all the pipes are laid out and connected they will look something like this. This is a particularly large and deep leach bed system designed for an apartment complex. Generally, leach fields require at least 4 feet of ground cover over the absorption area or 2 inches of foam insulation with 2 feet of ground cover over the insulation. This helps to keep your system from freezing in the winter and becoming inoperable.  

157_IMG_20120818_094010

Once the system is buried and grass is planted over it, often the only visible evidence will be the monitor tubes rising out of the ground. It is very important to leave these tubes in place and unobstructed so that they can be used to check on the health and functionality of the system in the future. 

109_2454-3-quickpic

Here is a picture of a sewer line coming out of a home and attaching to a plastic septic tank. The sewer line here has insulation under it to further prevent freezing. 

The entire system will soon be buried, leaving only the monitor tubes for access.

137_DSCN0062

Here is another septic tank and sewer line, covered with insulation and soon to be buried in earth cover.

131_Mt.-Wrangle-September-19-2007-012

This septic system is undergoing a performance evaluation! Over 100 gallons of water will be added to the system, then the water level in the monitor tubes will be measured repeatedly over time to assess how efficiently the system can absorb the water. 

Eventually, all systems will fail. As they filter out the particulates from your wastewaster they will eventually become plugged and require replacement. How long a system lasts depends on it's construction, environment, and useage. For tips on how to prolong the life of your system check out our FAQ page

110_2454-4-quickpic

Open Monday through Friday 9:00 - 5:00

(907) 456-3854

results@goldstreamtechnical.com

1449 Gillam Way
Suite B
Fairbanks, AK 99701

We accept cash, checks, and all major credit cards!

credit cards

Open Monday through Friday

9:00 - 5:00

(907) 456-3854

results@goldstreamtechnical.com

1449 Gillam Way
Suite B
Fairbanks, AK 99701

We accept cash, checks, and all major credit cards!